Hardware (quad-buffered) stereo setup

Stereo

RV has a variety of stereo options. The biggest distinction to keep in mind is the difference between hardware stereo, which is done using the built in capabilities of the graphics card, and the other modes which are basically alternate rendering techniques (anaglyph, checkerboard, side-by-side, etc). Hardware stereo requires an Nvidia Quadro card (even older ones work well) on Linux and Windows. On OSX ATI and Nvidia cards can work.

The first step is to load stereo material correctly. This means load the first eye, and then the second eye 'as a layer.' This can be done through the file browser, with drag/drop or on the command line using the [ ] symbols to collect sources into layers.

Windows

On Windows, hardware stereo modes are manged by the Nvidia control panel.

For Example here are the settings from one of our test machines:

Nvidia Settings:
Use Shutter Glasses
Stereo Enable
Force Stereo Shuttering: off
Stereo Swap Eyes: off

Driver Version:
Forceware 162.65

Card:
Quadro FX 560

OS:
Windows XP 32

Linux

  • On Linux, you must setup the xorg.conf file properly to enable the desired stereo mode. This is not really an RV issue. RV uses GL and simply requests a stereo buffer. If it exists, RV renders to it. There are some notes about this in the stereo appendix of the RV Users Manual. There are extensive docs on the web. This is basically an Nvidia/X/Linux configuration issue.
  • Digital Flat Panels may be rejected for stereo unless allow DFP is set in the xorg.conf file.
  • glxinfo -t can be used on linux to confirm that stereo is enabled
  • In some cases the 'Composite' extension must be disabled in xorg.conf for stere to work like this:
Section "Extensions"
Option "Composite" "off"
EndSection
  • Check the /var/log/Xorg.0.log file for info regarding stereo. For example if Composite extension is conflicting with stereo you will get this error:
(WW) NVIDIA(0): Stereo is incompatible with the Composite extension.
(II) NVIDIA(0): Disabling stereo.

In addition to glxinfo -t, you can also look at the nvidia-settings control panel in the "OpenGL/GLX information" tab to see if mode in the 'st' column has 'y' in it. This is the same as 1 in the glxinfo -t ste/reo column.

The way to check for this on linux is the command glxinfo -t. 
It will output a table like this. The 9th colum (ste-reo) should
have some 1's in it showing the stereo modes.

Vis Vis Visual Trans buff lev render DB ste r g b a aux dep ste accum buffers MS MS
ID Depth Type parent size el type reo sz sz sz sz buf th ncl r g b a num bufs
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
0x21 24 TrueColor 0 32 0 rgba 1 0 8 8 8 0 4 24 8 16 16 16 16 0 0
0x22 24 DirectColor 0 32 0 rgba 1 0 8 8 8 0 4 24 8 16 16 16 16 0 0
0x23 24 TrueColor 0 32 0 rgba 1 0 8 8 8 8 4 24 8 16 16 16 16 0 0
0x24 24 TrueColor 0 32 0 rgba 0 0 8 8 8 0 4 24 8 16 16 16 16 0 0
0x25 24 TrueColor 0 32 0 rgba 0 0 8 8 8 8 4 24 8 16 16 16 16 0 0
0x26 24 TrueColor 0 32 0 rgba 1 0 8 8 8 0 4 24 0 16 16 16 16 0 0
0x27 24 TrueColor 0 32 0 rgba 1 0 8 8 8 8 4 24 0 16 16 16 16 0 0
0x28 24 TrueColor 0 32 0 rgba 0 0 8 8 8 0 4 24 0 16 16 16 16 0 0


Stereo Glasses

Tweak tests hardware stereo using shutter glasses from eDimensional
http://www.edimensional.com/product_info.php?cPath=21&products_id=100

These are very cheap ($70 for the wired version), but they might not be great for serious production use.

RV will also do anaglyph rendering so you can use red/green glasses. You can put RV in luminance mode (or just desaturate the color manually) which helps make the anaglyph look better. This is not ideal, but it can be used for checking the depth issues for a shot.

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